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Art in the Park

ARTPARKAMC poster72 2aArt in the Park, Worcester at Anna Maria College

The Department of Art & Design at Anna Maria College announces a new outdoor exhibition: Art in the Park, Worcester at Anna Maria CollegeThe exhibition features four sculptures on display from September 15, 2017 – May 13, 2018. The exhibiting artists hail from Vermont, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. Their works are viewed in the following order when entering the Paxton, MA campus: Joe Chirchirillo, Spinning Wheel; James Kitchen, Stumbling Blocks; Elizabeth Keithline, Two Boats, One for You, One for Me; and Michael Yefko, Suburban Slip No. 3

This collaborative effort between Art in the Park of Worcester and Anna Maria College introduces public art to the college campus. A spacious venue known for its natural beauty, the display becomes a highlight of the visual landscape. This biennial exhibit proposes to explore the diverse use materials and duplication of forms that build the individual work. Each sculpture has distinctive characteristics that lend to the seasonal calendar of Central Massachusetts: on snowy surfaces, in rusty fall colors, and throughout verdant spring, morning mist and lively sunshine mark the intervals and testament of their quotidian presence. 

The Worcester Cultural Council, under the direction and leadership of Gloria Hall, began Art in the Park in 2008.  Ms. Hall, currently the Executive Director of Art in the Park, with the Department of Visual Arts at Anna Maria College, initiated this partnership to provide the campus and community with occasions to interact more intimately with the work, enriching daily life and deepening the beholders’ relationship to the art and surrounding space.

The public, students, and staff are invited to explore and enjoy these sculptures throughout the academic year. Join Anna Maria College as various programs, and sculpture walks celebrate this new partnership. Materials and information about the sculptures are available by visiting the Office of Admissions or the Art Center in Miriam Hall.

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The Washington Center Internship Program Fundraiser Gala

TWC Gala 2017

Pictured from left to right:  Timothy Ray, Class of 2014; Thanasi Christoforu, Class of 2014; Charles (Tony) Valenti, Class of 2014; Tori Fabiano, class of 2017; Prof. Dianne White, (also a Washington Center alumnus); Eric Kanavos (current intern) class of 2018; Victor Sambola, Class of 2015.

On evening of October 2nd, Professor Dianne White had the pleasure of hosting the Anna Maria alumni of the program at the Washington Center gala event in Washington, D.C.. And as a Washington Center alumnus herself, she was especially delighted to do so.  Those in attendance were:  Thanasi Christoforou, INTERPOL; Tori Fabiano, currently applying to law school; Timothy Ray, Montgomery County Government, Department of Police, State of Maryland; and Victor Sambola, Department of Homeland Security.  Also in attendance was our student who is currently interning with the U.S. Marshals Service, Eric Kanavos and Charles (Tony) Valenti, an AMC alumnus who also works for Montgomery County Government, Department of Police.  

There were so many noteworthy moments during the evening, but the greatest maybe the immense pride and happiness Professor White felt simply being in the company of our graduated Criminal Justice and Law and Society students who not only distinguished themselves during their time in D.C. as interns, but currently in their positions at several esteemed state and federal governmental agencies.  All of our alumni in attendance were effusive in their praise of The Washington Center Internship Program.  They described the experience as the primary impetus in bringing them back to the Metropolitan D.C. area and in securing their current positions in law enforcement.  They were also effusive in their praise of their professors at AMC, some of whom they described as “making it possible for me to be here.”  Our alumni of the program gave a special shout out, as it were, to the former Washington Center liaison for the college, Prof. Michael McCartney, with whom many stay in touch.  Also noteworthy is the generosity all of our alumni at the gala (as well as several who could not attend) who have regularly offered the liaisons and our interns in the program.  For example, within ten minutes of meeting Eric Kanavos, Tim Ray asked him if he would be interested in a ride along.  Tim then turned to me and said, “If there is anything I can do for you and your students, I’d be happy to.”  It was a night of celebration, indeed!

 

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Best Horror Film Themes

Spooky House

 

Throughout history, music has been used as a medium to elevate the spirit in a liturgical setting, served as entertainment, as well as medicinal therapy. Music has also had a deep connection with inciting fear to the masses. Audiences and composers understand the power that music has over the psyche of the listener. In the spirit of Halloween, we will look at music’s role in film.

During the Middle Ages, use of the tritone, often referred to as “the devil’s interval,” was banned in liturgical music. Unlike the misleading name, the tritone consists of only two notes but is separated by three whole steps in music. Some speculate that it is a mocking of the Holy Trinity. When you hear both notes together, this particular interval causes uneasiness and discomfort to the listener. It is no surprise then that many films heavily use this interval within a composition to move the audience to feel unbalanced. Some people even allege they hear the interval playing in a drone, trance-like manner throughout the entirety of a movie to cause an hour and half of utter fright.

Regarding the tonality of a horror film score, composers use dissonance to their advantage. Dissonant chords cause the audience to feel unstable and need to resolve harmonically. Throughout music history, every great composer utilized dissonance to take the listener on a musical journey.  It was how they took the audience to the resolution that separated the good composers from the great composers. The general concept behind dissonance is that it elicits a feeling that something is wrong – a concept prevalent in every horror film.

The juxtaposition of volume is a musical device always employed in cinema. Often times, the audience will jump at the sudden rush of musical notes. The famous shower scene in the film “Psycho” had audiences reeling in fear due in large part to this very musical device.

As music continues to progress, instruments are being created to give us different timbres. Relevant composers will even make use of untraditional instruments or untraditional playing methods. Composer Krysztof Penderecki’s famous song “Threnody” was used in the popular film “The Shining.”

My top six horror film pics using these fear-inducing musical schemes are:

  1. Insidious – This particular film begins with perhaps the most memorable and frightening opening credits. The music during the opening credits is directly responsible for this reason.
  2. Halloween – The simple Michael Myers melody that we all know is perhaps the most recognizable theme song for any antagonist in a horror film genre. Darth Vader’s “Imperial March” is probably the only song that better associates a character with a theme song.
  3. The Wizard of Oz “The Witches’ Theme” – Before horror film fanatics throw a fit, what other children’s film allows a beloved main character to be ripped to shreds? Having produced, directed, choreographed and music directed the stage production many times, the dissonant chords used for the Wicked Witch caused tremendous fear in the four-year-olds that were sure to attend this production.
  4. The Shining – During this film, the use of the devil’s interval, dissonance, and Threnody is absolutely masterful.
  5. Jaws – The use of rests in this two-note theme is absolutely incredible. This song continues to instill great panic to beach-goers’ worldwide.
  6. Psycho – Already mentioned earlier, no musical score employs the musical devices mentioned earlier better than this film. It continues to set the standard for film writing. Be sure to thank Bernard Hermann for composing the greatest horror film soundtrack ever written!

Happy Halloween!

Reagan Paras
Director of Music
Anna Maria College

*Originally appeared in Worcester Magazine in October 2016

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Memorial for Professor Andrew McCarthy

Andrew McCarthy Memorial Tree

 

To honor the life of Andrew McCarthy, a beloved Theology and Humanities Associate Professor at Anna Maria College, a ceremony was held on Wednesday, October 4. The ceremony took place at the front commons, in front of the eastern redbud tree planted there in his memory. Professor McCarthy was known for his joyous spirit, devout spirituality and volunteerism.  Professor McCarthy was a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and earned is M.A. in Theology from Spring Hill College, and Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies from Catholic University of America.  He was a prolific scholar, publishing works in the fields of theology and teaching science, and authored the book “Francis of Assisi as Artist of the Spiritual Life.”  Everyone who met Professor McCarthy saw what a tremendous human being he was and the Anna Maria College community misses him dearly. We encourage those who knew him to visit the redbud tree to reflect on your memories of Professor McCarthy.

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Frank Poor, From the Road

Frank Poor Poster web

 

Frank Poor, From the Road

The Art Center Gallery at Anna Maria College presents Frank Poor, From the Road, October 25 – December 22, 2017.  Originally from Woodstock, Georgia, Frank Poor settled in industrial Cranston, Rhode Island after graduating from RISD.  Poor fabricates architectural structures, photographs, and prints related to Southern vernacular architecture.  Krakow Witkin Gallery of Boston represents Poor.  He exhibits nationally and has received numerous honors, grants, and awards. Poor blends and juxtaposes elements of sculpture and photography, where photos are sometimes printed on glass or panel, and other times mounted directly to the wall. The sculptural elements represent buildings he photographs in the South. Witnessing the light, shadow, and reflection of the sculptures is to the viewer as the photographs are to Poor’s experience while photographing. The Anna Maria College exhibit of Frank Poor, From the Road considers the artist’s investigation of experience, and proposes to explore the discontinuity between memory and reality, subjects which drive the work.

An accompanying catalog further explores the artist’s work and will be available for sale at the Opening. The public, students, staff, and classes are invited to attend the Opening Reception on Wednesday, October 25 from 5:00 – 7:00 pm, featuring a discussion between Poor and Gallery Director Darrell Matsumoto.

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Annual Art Faculty Exhibition

FacultyArt

Department of Art & Design Faculty Exhibition 2017

The Art Center Gallery at Anna Maria College

announces the Annual Art Faculty Exhibition from

Wednesday, September 13 – Wednesday, October 21. 

Gallery Hours are Monday thru Friday, 9:00am-3:30pm.

The work spans categories of painting, photography,

calligraphy, and sculpture, representing recent work

by the department’s faculty of fine artists;

Joseph DiGregorio, Dyan Gulovsen, Alice

Lambert, Timmary Leary, Darrell Matsumoto,

Joseph Ray, Sumiyo Toribe, Jason Travers,

David Wackell, and Michael Yefko. 

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An Interview with Lisa Summer

LisaSummer

Tension on the Korean peninsula is a major topic in the news and the summer was unusually tumultuous. In May, the South Korean Supreme Court upheld parliament’s impeachment of South Korean President Park Geun-hye, the country’s first female president, on corruption charges. The decision was met with violent protests. Then, North Korea escalated tensions by conducting several missile tests and detonated a nuclear device as part of a weapons test.

Anna Maria College Professor Lisa Summer, Director of Music Therapy, spent several weeks in South Korea teaching at Ewha Womans University in Seoul. Ewha is the foremost women’s university in South Korea.

We had an opportunity to talk to Dr. Summer about her experience.

What was the political atmosphere like in South Korea during your time there, especially among your students?

When South Korean President Park Geun-hye was forced out of office due to cronyism and corruption, Ewha – the university where I was teaching – felt direct repercussions of the cronyism charges, as Ewha’s own president, a friend of Park Geun-hye, was removed from office herself.

Dozens were injured in ensuing protests over the president’s impeachment. Some even died, something very rare in a society where violent protests are uncommon. Soon after, North Korea escalated tensions with more missile test. Despite all of this, students – and the public in general – continued to carry on with their normal activities. For the most part, the students and teachers with whom I interacted on a daily basis did not discuss the events that were contemporaneous with my visit.

How would you categorize the South Korean perception of President Trump as it pertains to the tensions with North Korea? And the public perception of the United States? Is it changing?

The average South Korean, in my opinion, regardless of political leaning, is more focused on the behavior of the leaders of North and South Korea. A few people expressed concern about President Trump’s comprehension of the North South situation, but no one I spoke with questioned the state of the American alliance.

How is the Korean public responding to the current threats? How do the threats play out in the local news?

Air raid sirens rang out once for a scheduled public drill while I was there. I was informed prior to the drill, and we carried on as if it were not happening. However, outside on the streets air raid procedures were practiced. Because our students didn’t participate in the drill, I can’t compare it to the Cold War drills from the 1960s. My experiences in the 60’s involved taking action as a class, proceeding to the basement of our elementary school and covering up against a wall. The planned drill in South Korea didn’t worry or even inconvenience me.

Did you witness or are you aware of any student activism taking place in Korea related to the nuclear tensions?

I witnessed no activism personally and was more aware of the cronyism and dismissal of the president because that had direct bearing on my presence at Ewha, where their president was removed as a consequence of the removal of the national president. The student activism I experienced was focused on Ewha’s student body wanting a say in the selection of the university’s next president.

As an American, why do you think Koreans didn’t engage with you on the nuclear situation?

While the North Korean situation may be a conversation topic for the locals, they may have considered as rude to bring up with me. I guess it may be like when one invites non-family members to a family dinner. Those of us hosting would probably not want to discuss Uncle Charlie’s recent conviction, nor would we bring up Cousin Bob’s personal issues. It’s not that we would be “hiding” things from our guests per se but more like we wouldn’t want to trouble them with our internecine struggles. And similarly, Charlie’s violent proclivities and Bob’s drunkenness are probably never going to impact our guests’ lives, so why bring it up with them? North Korea’s government’s animus for South Korea and the US is highly unlikely to have any real impact on me during my visit, so it’s not an issue that my hosts would necessarily want to focus on.

Did you ever feel a desire to talk about North Korea while you were there? Did you feel as though it wasn’t a welcome topic of conversation?

Honestly no. When you’re in another country for an extended period of time you inevitably ingrain yourself in the culture and customs. No one else was really talking about it, so I never had the desire to offer my two-cents. It didn’t appear to be something that was a taboo either, it just wasn’t on their radar at the time.

How did you feel as an American abroad? As an American in a danger zone?

I am at ease when I travel abroad, whether in Korea, or China, or other countries. The political tensions I see on the news – in my experience – are about governments, not people; about ideologies as preached by individuals in the news, not about my intercourse with people in the street. My husband and I travel in countries some identify as “enemies”, such as the People’s Republic of China, or identified as potential threats, such as Indonesia. But, on the streets, we encountered friendly faces; people happy to have American visitors. Often, we are the only Westerners in a location we are visiting. Then the hospitality and friendliness increases to the point of embarrassment.

How did you use music or how does music play a role in this tense climate?

My teaching and supervision this past August focused on the use of music therapy with individuals with well adults and with adults with mental health issues.  In August I taught and supervised music therapists regarding a music therapy method called Supportive Music & Imagery. Supportive MI is being used by these music therapists to reduce their clients’ anxiety about political issues, and to help their clients cope with the pressure of the current tense climate and its effect upon their daily life and relationships.  

Are people using music as an outlet for an emotional response? How?

Yes, people listen to music on a daily basis to express and discharge their negative feelings and anxiety.  They are making playlists on their phones, listening at home, and especially on the commute to work. 

Do you think music therapy could be used here in the US to ease stress over the political climate?

I do! I think there are a lot of us who would benefit from it. Even those of use that live near Anna Maria can still feel some anxiety or fear about North Korea even though we are safe from them. Music therapy is different than conventional talk therapy because it allows us to be more interactive and expressive than a conversation.

Describe the levels of civic engagement you saw among South Koreans during your time

I would say there level of civic engagement is up there with ours. Given the timing of my visit, it’s likely that I was there to observe levels that were higher than normal. What is interesting to me is how focused they are on what’s going on in South Korea as opposed to the rest of the world. I know Americans are often criticized for sometimes being out of the loop on international events, but I think you could say the same for South Korea or any other country for that matter. We will always tend to focus on what’s going on in our own backyard rather than our neighbors.

Aside from the Presidential scandal, what other reasons do you think contributed to the lack of discussion about North Korea?

I don’t think it’s apathy but more a sense of normalcy. All South Koreans live with the fact  that they have an erratic, sometimes violent neighbor to the North. While the increased number of provocations may have been shocking to us, to them it could just be a fact of life. They deal with them on a daily basis so nothing North Korea does is really surprising anymore I imagine. 

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Paxton Civilian Police Academy

Paxton Civilian Police Academy
PAXTON — For the first time, Anna Maria College students will receive credit for participating in the Civilian Police Academy, which kicks off later this month. Civilian Police Academy programs are designed to acquaint individuals who are not sworn police officers with the activities of their local police department

“In its third year, our previous class participants were mostly the older generation,” Organizer and Police Sgt. Guy Bibeau said. “But this year, we incorporated an Anna Maria College credit program, where college students can earn credit after writing papers on what they learned in the academy.”

The academy also appeals to civilians who are new to law enforcement. Participants will be part of hands-on mock trials where they can arrest a “criminal,” learn about interviewing and interrogation through fingerprinting, and experience the use of force through a domestic disturbance. Those in the academy will learn about a new topic each week, ranging from criminal/constitutional law, canine tactics, role of the medical examiner, domestic violence, community policing, and social media.

The academy is free and funded by the police department. Thirteen people are currently enrolled, and there is space for 25 people, Bibeau said. However, participants must be more than 18-years-old. About seven Anna Maria students are enrolled so far. Classes are held on Tuesdays for nine weeks from 6 to 9 p.m.

Anna Maria College Criminal Justice Programs for Undergraduate and Graduate Studies Director Dr. Tonisha M. Pinckney said the civilian academy can break stereotypes.

“The Civilian Academy is an amazing opportunity to connect the police with members of the community (including Anna Maria College students),” Pinckney said. “At a time when there are misperceptions, misunderstandings, and miscommunication between law enforcement and the community, this partnership is designed to educate the community and provide the police an opportunity to positively interact with those they serve and protect.”

Community misperceptions of law enforcement can only be countered by education and communication, Pinckney continued. The AMC Criminal Justice programs have 12 specializations, including: law enforcement and corrections, criminal justice policy and reform, and mental illness crisis intervention. In order to better educate students, college courses are taught by expert practitioners, Pinckney said.

In keeping with that tradition, the Civilian Academy course includes: subject matter experts, such as: Dr. Tonisha M. Pinckney (topics: on domestic violence, community policing and media, and identity theft), Dr. Ann Marie Mires (topic: role of the medical examiner), Dt. Sgt. Mailman (Worcester Police – topic: gangs), and Sgt. Guy Bibeau (topics: Use of force/ tasers and criminal law).

Other topics include: motor vehicle law, operating under the influence (alcohol and drugs), court procedure, firearms safety course with a certification included, and sexual assaults, Bibeau added. CEMELC Canine and Webster Police Officer Aaron Suss will conduct a canine demonstration.

However, the academy can be more than just learning the jest of what goes on in police work.

“In the past, some came in with tunnel vision, or a onesided view of what we do, and they graduated with a totally different outlook,” Bibeau said. “Hopefully, all students will leave with a little more knowledge and understanding about policing than when they came in.”

Molly Bish Center and Forensic Criminology Program Director, Dr. Ann Marie Mires, teaches a lecture on medical-legal death investigation in the academy. Mires commented on the benefit of the partnership.

“Having the subject matter experts come from the college creates that bridge between the community, the college, and policing,” Mires said. “We want our students to enroll in the course so that they can really see first-hand that interconnection between the college, citizenry, and the police. Instead of just reading about it, they get hands-on experience.”

Bibeau said he will take the time to explain different aspects of the curriculum since some students need attention than others. For instance, he will teach how an arrest is more than speaking to someone and then handcuffing the suspect.

“We can’t change anyone, but I hope they leave with a better understanding and appreciation for what we do day-in and day-out,” Bibeau said. “For the citizens, it’s a way to see the insides of what goes on around here, and for the Anna Maria students, it’s a way to see if they’re interested in police work — or not.”

The Anna Maria College Criminal Justice programs consist of criminal justice, law, politics and society, and forensic criminology. She said the school creates strong leaders, as well as educated and socially conscious citizens. Pinckney said the academy is all about community policing.

“The Civilian Academy will give the opportunity for citizens to not only appreciate the perspectives of law enforcement but a deeper understanding of how they navigate their role within the communities,” Pinckney said. “So having a better-informed citizenry creates a safer community – now we have buy-in from the community. Creates a partnership with the citizens – true community policing.”

Bibeau went onto say it’s a way to bring the community closer to the police department so that it’s not so surface level on both ends.

Pinckney explained that the Paxton Police ran the Civilian Academy successfully, but this partnership has allowed the college to expand upon the topics.

“The course is an experiential learning course designed to expose students to the laws, procedures, and processes of policing from the perspective of local law enforcement, facilitate a connectedness and collaboration between the community, AMC students, and Paxton Police, and provide an opportunity for positive discussions regarding misperceptions of policing and misunderstandings about roles of police in the community,” Pinckney said.

Bibeau said that participants can also go on night ride-alongs with a signed liability form after the program.

Anna Maria College Chief Information Officer Michael Miers said students enrolled in the academy were not able to comment to protect their privacy.

The first class, which includes a station tour, will be on Sept. 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The program will run for approximately 13 weeks.

Applications are available at the station, 576 Pleasant St. Participants must sign a covenant not to sue and undergo a background and criminal record check. For information, email , or call 508-793-3100, ext. 3155.

 

Copyright
The Landmark
By Tara Vocino
Correspondent

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Anna Maria College Launches Accelerated Bachelor Degree Program

AcceleratedDegreeAnna Maria College announced today the launch of their new Accelerated Bachelor Degree Program which will allow students to complete their bachelor degree in just seven semesters (3.5 years).

“We are proud to launch our new Accelerated Degree Program,” said Christine Holmes, Ed.D, Vice President for Academic Affairs at Anna Maria College. “We saw the need in today’s competitive market to offer students the opportunity to complete their desired degree in a timely fashion. Tuition is a top concern for all students and the Accelerated Program allows ambitious students to reach their goals in a cost effective way. Anna Maria provides the right class size and course availability to make this opportunity this dream a reality while cutting costs.”

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Higher Education Can Drive Civic Engagement

President Mary Lou RetelleFifty-five years ago, President John F. Kennedy famously used his first speech as commander-in-chief to implore upon young Americans to “ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.”

That call to action drove civic engagement for the Baby Boomer generation for decades to come. Men and women signed up for the Peace Corps, the military, community service organizations, and opportunities of all shapes and sizes in order to improve our society.

But on the eve of electing a new president, it’s time for a call to action to a new generation.

Today more than ever, there are many opportunities for young people to check out from community action and stay isolated. We live in a world that is more connected than ever and our country’s young adults are eager to take advantage of new opportunities, making them more transient in their communities and in the workplace.

Studies show that Millennials are waiting longer to get married, have children, and buy a home. So, while the world may be smaller for Millennials, all of these factors combined reduce their civic engagement at the local level.

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Foti Earns CoSIDA Academic All-District™ Honors

fotiSIM16 12Junior Rebecca Foti (Bedford, N.H.) of the Anna Maria College volleyball team has been named to the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) Academic All-District™ First Team, as announced by the organization on Thursday evening.

The CoSIDA Academic All-District™ Teams recognize the nation’s top student-athletes across the country for their combined performances athletically and in the classroom.

Foti becomes the first volleyball player and only the second student-athlete in AMCAT history to earn this award.

An art therapy and psychology double-major with a 3.92 GPA, Foti was instrumental in the volleyball team’s historic season. Under her leadership, the AMCATS posted a program-best 21-11 record, went on a record eight-match winning streak, and advanced to the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC) semifinals for the first time in program history. 

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Anna Maria College Receives Donation from FireIce Solutions Towards Fire Extinguisher Study

20161011 amc 0218Anna Maria College has received a $25,500 donation from FireIce Solutions LLC, an innovative fire protection product manufacturer, to support the college’s Fire Science Department conduct a fire extinguisher study.

Students in the Anna Maria College’s Fire Science Department will be testing the effectiveness of various fire extinguisher products currently on the market. These evaluations require secure, live fire testing that imitate various fire scenarios such as combustible-metal, cooking oil and car tire fires. The donation from Fire Ice Solutions will go directly towards the construction of an outdoor concrete burn structure to conduct controlled and functional live fire tests.

“We are extremely grateful to FireIce Solutions for their generous donation to support our Fire Science Program,” said Dr. Judith Kenary, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs. “This burn structure will provide our students with an outdoor classroom in a safe designated area to conduct burns and will enable them to partake in various research and testing opportunities to further enhance their Fire Science education.”

The burn structure (12’ X 8’ X 8’) will feature a gravel base and be reinforced with concrete slab walls. This structure will also help foster future research opportunities as new fire science technologies come to market.

“The burn structure takes our students out of the classroom to safely explore various fire science concepts under real world terms,” said Dr. James Carritte, Director of the Fire Science Emergency Programs. “This unique facility will help advance the Fire Safety Program’s education and allow Anna Maria College to stand apart from other programs.”

The grant proposal was written by Kolin Matthews, a senior undergrad in Anna Maria College’s Fire Science Program, along with his faculty mentor Mike Matros, a Firefighter/Paramedic with the Sudbury Fire Department and Fire Science instructor at the college. FireIce Solutions also provides several ongoing internship opportunities for Anna Maria College students.

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7 Concerns You May Have Before Nursing Clinicals Begin

15413 a male nurse taking the blood pressure of a woman pvFor every nursing student, the start of your first clinical rotation – or the return to clinical – is a new and exciting time but may spark some worries.

Here are seven common concerns you might have, and some ways to address them:

1. I am SO nervous!

Of course you are! The good news is a little bit of nervousness will keep you on your toes. Too much might lead to not performing as well, though. Try shifting your perspective a bit. Put yourself in your patients’ shoes. Remember that what might seem like a simple illness or procedure in your mind is a big deal to them. They’re stressed too. Concentrate on putting your patients at ease. Be compassionate, genuine and really listen to them. Once a connection is made, both of you will feel more relaxed. Keep in mind that both the instructor and the facility nurses are there to help you get acclimated.

2. The patient might not want to have a student nurse.

This is unusual. After all, the instructor would have already asked the patients if they mind having students. Also, think about it: patients get to have an eager beaver’s undivided attention for an entire shift, along with the oversight of the primary nurse and the clinical instructor. It’s a win-win! Patients generally are happy to help students learn as it makes them feel that they are contributing at a time when they feel quite helpless. If a patient declines a student, your instructor will simply find you another patient.

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Anna Maria attends Leadership & Legacy Gala in Washington DC

9.27.16TWCGala

Anna Maria College attended the The Washington Center's gala paying tribute to leadership in higher education.

This year’s Gala raised more than $480,000 for student scholarships that will be offered for hundreds of students throughout the 2016-2017 academic year at the Washington Center.

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