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Posted by on in Debb's Review
Since midway through the fall 2013 semester, the major topic of discussion at AMC has been the new Information Commons, which is located in the space that used to house the upper level of the Mondor-Eagen Library. The traditional library setting is now located on the lower level with new electronic book stacks for the college's literary collection. The new student-oriented environment on the upper level offers computer stations for online research and group work, Information Technology Services (also known as the "IT Department"), The Center for Teaching Excellence where students and professors can interact outside of the classroom, The MIDI Lab for music majors, a Graphic Design lab, and The School of Business (classrooms and professional offices). The Information Commons also attracts students and faculty with the warmth of its color scheme, as well as the wonderful working fireplace that will really come in handy during those cold winter days and nights.
 
Personally, I consider The Information Commons one of my favorite places on campus whether it is to get research done, attend my business classes or just to relax my mind in a peaceful setting. This area is a lounge, research and learning environment all in one: How can you beat that?
 
My typical time spent in The Information Commons is to do research papers, work on new internship ideas, plan for meetings and events, work on group projects and study with classmates. Since The Information Commons was created, I find myself utilizing this spot much more than I could ever imagine. Out of the many things I like about this space, what I love the most are the tables set up for study groups not far away from the computers. This new space is definitely a great asset on campus. The hours of availability (24/7) are amazing especially for students like me who have schedules that are not flexible and who can mainly get their work done only during late hours. Even the fact that the School of Business is located in the Information Commons amazes me. The professors and the Dean of The School of Business, Dean Forsberg, are located right across from the business classrooms, which is very convenient for students in the business program, as well as the faculty. I feel very important when entering such a vibrant environment that has the academic school in which I will be receiving my degree from represented. My overall description of this new environment would be inclusive, warm, helpful, and modern because of the colors, carpet patterns, fireplace and updated resources.
 
To give you a little more insight into The Information Commons, I sat down with President Calareso to get his take on the new space. When I asked him how Anna Maria College was able to have this project completed, he informed me that it was all about timing, resources and student demand. He went on to tell me that about a year ago the school secured enough money to bring a project that just started out as verbal and written ideas to life. Also, it took meetings with students who discussed their various needs and concerns about a new learning environment; and that is how the concept came about.
 
Anna Maria College breathed life into the idea of The Information Commons to create an opportunity and a modern resource for students to learn, hang out and study outside of the residence halls. This space was created with the intention that students would use it to help them excel in and outside of the classroom. President Calareso also informed me that very little changes would be made to The Information Commons besides the art that will soon be hung and any upkeep that might need to be made throughout the course of the year. The next big project that Anna Maria College plans to work on is the campus center. For more details on that upcoming project, you have to look out for future posts under Debb's Review.

Posted by on in Matt's Corner
With social media becoming a very popular platform, it is important to understand how to get the best use possible out of it and make it work for you! As mentioned in previous posts, social media has been able to aid faculty and universities in many ways to strengthen their relationships with students. However, there are always ways that YOU as a student can use social media to help better your life style and future.
 
When it comes to your own social media practices, you can always use them to improve your personal image whether you are using the tool to apply for a job, college, or just in general. When I went to a conference last year for undergrad students interested in the field of higher education there was a session on social media that made me look at it from a whole new perspective. The session talked about the importance of making sure your social media platform represents you in the best way possible. This means making sure there is never offensive material or anything that may portray any organizations you are affiliated with negatively.
 
How can you do this? To utilize your social media so that it works for you and represents you in a positive way, always make sure that you have your content set to private, such as, approving any posts made by another person. Just because you aren't the one posting it, if a friend posts something offensive on your wall or page and you don't delete it, you are basically saying that you agree with or have no problem with what he or she is saying. This can be just as harmful to your image as something coming right from you.
 
When I came to college, I knew Facebook was an easy and efficient way to keep in touch with my friends from high school or new people that I was about to meet in college. However, I realized that because I was going to start building a professional image of myself, it would be a good idea to delete my old Facebook from high school and start a fresh new page. The reason I did this was not because I had offensive material, but because the old Facebook represented a younger me as a teenager. Making a new one allowed me to restart my social media presence in a more mature way.
 
Small things like this are simple ways that can help you keep in an eye on how you look on social media. It is always good to make sure you present yourself well in all media outlets, no matter your age, profession, or how much or how little social media platforms you use.
 
Do you utilize social media like this? Have you ever experienced a situation where someone was reprimanded because of content on their social media platforms?

There are very few things in the world that are irrefutable. Two plus two will always equal four; the sun will always rise in the east and set in the west; and even when they win, the Red Sox will cause us “agita!”

But it is rarely surprising to find research that seems to contradict or at least provide an alternative perspective about educational issues. There are multiple theories and applications and there are always varying opinions and interpretations.

A little over a month ago, I wrote a blog entitled, “The Value of an Online Degree” (September 8, 2013). Referencing highly reliable research, this study indicated extremely positive views towards online degrees … views comparable to perceptions of traditional degree programs. But a recent Gallup Poll provides a significantly different perspective.

Gallup recently polled two groups of 1000 adults asking them if they thought “online education was better” in a number of categories. The results were mixed at best.

In terms of overall quality, only 34% of respondents rated online programs as “excellent” or good” compared to 68% rating traditional four-year programs as “excellent” or “good.” Online programs only received highly favorable ratings in terms of the “wide range of options for curriculum” (72% say online better) and providing “good value for the money” (67% say online better).

However, respondents believe that online programs provide “less rigorous testing and grading,” less qualified instructors, and, in direct contrast with the previous study I reported, “less credence with employers compared with traditional, classroom-based education.”

As I reflect upon this data, I think the reader has to retain a clear perspective. These results are likely an accurate reflection of the general public. The 2000+ respondents in the two samples in Gallup’s study were picked in a way to insure randomness and conformity to national demographic trends. They were all 18 years old or older.

But they were not disproportionately college educated. We know that fewer than 30% of Americans earn a college degree. So what did these respondents know about online programs or traditional programs? Only 5% had any experience with online education in any form. So how were they sufficiently informed to assess?

Public perceptions tell us a great deal about how we communicate the value and quality of online education to the general public. The previous study focused on the assessment of employers and recruitment professionals, who may not have taken an online course or program, but have a database of candidates and employees who come to them with varied educational backgrounds.

From my experience, the best way to understand and appreciate online education is to try it. I have been amazed to see faculty and students wary of the comparability of online programs in terms of quality and personal attention go through a conversion experience once they teach or take a class.

There will always be traditional on-ground programs. But the reality is that online education is growing because of the demands of today’s and tomorrow’s students. There is still a lot of educating to do about online education, but it is worth it.

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Posted by on in President's Blog

Last week as I was scanning the higher ed trade journals, an article caught my eye entitled, “Corruption in Higher Education Appears to Be on the Rise Globally.” In reading the article, I was introduced to an organization new to me … Transparency International.

Transparency International was founded in 1993 and now has 100 national chapters worldwide. This organization describes itself as “independent and accountable” ... stating that they “are politically non-partisan and place great importance on our independence. We alone determine our programmes and activities – no donor has any input into Transparency International’s policies. Our sources of funding are made transparent as is our spending.”

The organization was founded for a simple but challenging purpose … to address corruption in the world in areas of government, business, society and individual lives. The organization takes public positions, conducts research, and is active in many projects throughout the world. One of their recent studies focused on education.

The lengthy study provided two interesting and important perspectives. First, there is a delineation of corrupt practices. In the United States, the most challenging concern is plagiarism. This finding comes as no surprise to those of us who teach college students. We continue to find evidence of students using someone else’s work as their own or more commonly, using the “cut and paste” feature on their computers without appropriate citation and reference.

The corruption problems in other parts of the world are more pervasive. The report cites entire systems of education that are totally corrupt. Unethical practices include widespread falsification of grades, payoffs to faculty and administrations prior to completion of degrees, requirements to purchase professors’ books in order to receive a passing grade, sexual exploitation of students by faculty and administrators and falsification of applications.

While most of these systemic problems were found to a greater extent in other parts of the world, falsification of application materials is also an issue in this country. This study found this problem to be more common with international students seeking to study in this country who submit personal statements written by someone else and falsified Toefl and other language proficiency scores.

But a large part of this study may be even more important than exposing corrupt practices. The report reflects the organization’s priority to “ensure that the next generation is prepared to say no to corruption.” It describes a number of specific actions and strategies to combat corruption, and address the abuse of power, bribery and secret dealings that are “corroding the educational experience.” The report challenges governments, international organizations, businesses, educational systems, and civil society to “ensure good governance is promoted in education policy all over the world.”

In reading this report, I was simultaneously depressed and enthusiastic. It is sad to see the continued evidence of corruption and the erosion of integrity in the educational systems throughout the world. Teaching and learning are noble professions and I always want to believe that those who choose to teach and lead educational institutions do so with a commitment to truth, fairness and quality.

But this report also embraces the value of shaping both minds and hearts. While we have a responsibility to provide students with knowledge, we must also help them to develop wisdom. We are responsible to help them develop values that will serve their personal goals and the Common Good.

I encourage you to visit the website of Transparency International. The battle to overcome corruption may be daunting, but this organization is fighting the good fight!

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Posted by on in President's Blog

Typically, I change the topic of my blog from week to week. The exception is when I am commenting on a large study where the data and findings seem better shared over several weeks. I had a new topic in mind for this week, but then the reactions to last week’s blog came pouring in.

From week to week, I receive 20-30 responses to my blog. Last week’s blog on “What Would Pope Francis Say?” generated over 70 responses. About half agreed with my perspective. The rest were critical and followed two lines of thought.

Some argued that the Pope didn’t mean that issues related to life and contraception were not paramount in the Church. For these responders, this is the first and primary issue about which the Church should speak and advocate.

Others argued against big government and social service programs. If I ever see a picture of Pope Francis reading Dr. Seuss, perhaps these responders are correct that the Pope’s position is similar in some way to that of Senator Ted Cruz. But I really don’t think so.

First, none of us can really speak for Pope Francis. It is a rhetorical question. But what is clear after six months of his papacy is that this Pope is still an enigma. His every word and action is interpreted and used to advocate for a position. But we all need to listen more, read more, pray more, reflect more … and over time, we will come to understand his vision and his leadership for the Church and for the world.

My major concern, however, is with those who argue for a narrow agenda for the Church and a singular definition. If one agrees that the dignity of human life is paramount in the teachings of the Church, why is this the only issue about which the Church could, should, must speak? There are many Gospel values that we share with fellow Christians and people of all faiths and traditions. Shouldn’t the Church also speak out about injustice throughout culture and the world? Shouldn’t Church leaders speak out often and loudly?

More important, I find it difficult to accept the most narrow interpretation of the dignity of life. I share the belief in the sanctity of life and the need to protect unborn children. But the dignity of life that I read about in the Gospels and I hear preached about by Pope Francis has equal concern for the sick and the poor; the young and the old; the able and the disabled.

As passionate as the Church is about abortion and life issues, should we not also be as concerned that all people have health insurance and access to medical care; that all people have enough food and are paid a livable wage; that all people live free of war, violence and abuse; that all people are treated with respect and dignity; that all people experience the love of God if only through each of us?

Last week, the students of Anna Maria College, assisted by our Campus Ministry Department, sponsored a Homelessness Awareness Week. Every day, these dedicated students learned about issues related to homelessness, engaged in community service to directly help and support the homeless in our region, and even slept outside overnight with little comfort to experience if only briefly what it is like to be homeless. I was honored and humbled to address these students at their closing prayer service. Words can not describe how proud I am of their commitment to gospel values and their response to a call to action.

Homelessness Awareness Week is an expression of dignity of life. Social service programs are an expression of dignity of life. I cannot wait to hear what else Pope Francis helps us to better understand as we walk our journey of faith and service.

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)