Blog posts tagged in Presidents Blog

There have been a number of reports over the past several years that have questioned both the rigor and the efficacy of college educational practices. The book, Academically Adrift (2011), garnered international attention and painted a dismal picture of the current educational environment on most college campuses.

A new project entitled, College Educational Quality (CEQ), is being led by researchers at Teachers College at Columbia University and providing a different perspective. They have just published the results of their pilot study, and though it may be too early to draw too many conclusions, their approach to assessing quality is new and innovative.

The pilot study involved research on educational quality at two selective research institutions, one private and one public. The research team (graduate students) actually sat in on classes (more than 150 classroom observations) and studied curricula through the analysis of almost 150 syllabi. For the most part, the researchers observed classes and/or analyzed syllabi related to their own undergraduate majors.

Their assessment focused on two areas: academic rigor and teaching quality. Academic rigor involved:

-       The quality of cognitive complexity required (based on Bloom’s Taxonomy);

-       The amount of academic work (based on the research related to time on task and the quality of effort);

-       The standards and expectations assigned (based on widespread frameworks of standards and grade inflation).

Teaching quality involved:

-       Teaching in-depth subject matter and ideas;

-       Accessing and transforming prior knowledge;

-       Supporting learning.

What did they learn? In general, this study indicated that while there is room for improvement, the quality of education is better than often reported. Based on the research design, both institutions scored in the middle of the quality scale. In addition, there was no statistical difference between the scores at the two institutions.

More specifically, they found that most students attended classes (82%), instructors effectively introduced complex ideas, and the level of complexity was appropriate for college level learning. That’s the good news.

They also found that too many students were not actively engaged in the course material, expectations for class participation were low, and instructors too seldom connected the prior learning/knowledge of students with the current course.

Additional findings of interest included the correlation between academic rigor/teaching quality and longer classes (i.e., longer than an hour), smaller class sizes (i.e., less than 25) and student engagement (i.e., students asking questions and class discussions).

Those leading the CEQ effort readily admit that this is an initial study with limited data. But the criteria make sense to me and the initial results are hopeful. I will keep an eye on their subsequent research.

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Several years ago, AMC made the retention of current students its highest priority. Our belief was that if students were qualified to be admitted, they should only leave for reasons beyond our control (e.g., financial challenges, change of major not offered by AMC, homesickness). But if they were committed to their AMC careers, we should and would do everything possible to help them succeed inside and outside the classroom.

To that end, AMC created a Student Success Center and provided both senior leadership and additional staff to implement a series of retention based programs. Because this is so important to the College and our students, a recent article entitled, “An Hour Makes a Difference,” caught my attention.

The article summarizes a recent research project that analyzed the impact on first-generation college students who participated in a one hour seminar on adjusting to college. The results seem to indicate that this limited program with minimal cost had a significant impact on first-generation students in terms of higher GPA’s and increased use of college programs and resources. The impact on other students who participated in the same program was limited.

I tried unsuccessfully to find the actual details of this research. While I was pleased to read about these results, I remain skeptical that this program is sufficient to significantly impact retention.

At AMC, we have implemented multiple programs with the goal of increased retention. Retention efforts are measured through higher GPA’s, increased participation in the programs and services of the College, and greater levels of engagement and satisfaction. While those who may benefit the most are often first generation students, our programs are open to all students and benefit all students.

The fact of the matter is that it is also important for an above average student to receive the support necessary to excel. And students who do well in the classroom are not necessarily engaged fully in the life of the community. Our goal is to help each and every student achieve his or her goals for their AMC experience. So what do we do?

First, we offer a one week summer program. Rather than one hour, we provide our pre-freshmen with a five-day program of both academic preparation and community building. This program is open to every incoming freshman. They are invited to live on campus for a week at no cost. The benefits of this program have been extraordinary.

We also implemented a First Year Experience (FYE) course that every freshman takes in her or his first semester. This course provides students with the skills and abilities to be successful in their college life in multiple ways.

We have also implemented an early alert system. Faculty are encouraged to contact the Dean’s Council if a student misses class, fails to keep up with the workload, starts to receive lower grades, or indicates a personal issue. These problems are dealt with individually and swiftly to make sure that they do not become insurmountable.

Finally, we have opened our Student Success Center. Students can come to the Center seven days a week for help with a class, a skill, advisement, counseling, etc. If you need help in any way, the Success Center staff is there for you.

The results have been impressive. Retention rates have grown steadily. I think a one hour program is a good start. But a holistic approach is better. And we have the results to prove it!

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Posted by on in Rick's View

This week’s blog showcases an interview with Sarah Collins, a senior and Music Education Major at AMC.  Sarah is very active on campus and is the President of the Music Education Club, Publicist and Pit Director for the Zecconian Players and a former SGA Senator for the School of Visual and Performing Arts

Here’s what Sarah had to say:

Why did you choose AMC?

When I was in high school looking for colleges, my band director suggested AMC because of its strong music program. He got me in touch with the band director at the time and we really hit it off. I came for my audition for the music program and met many of the professors and knew it was the right fit for me.

What did you like about AMC when looking into this school?

One of the best aspects of AMC is that it's a small school where you're not a number, but you're a person. During my time here at AMC, I have been able to get specialized help on various subjects due to small classes and professor availability. I also like that when I came for my audition, the professors and students alike wanted to get to know me and came right up and introduced themselves. Once I officially decided to come to AMC and when I came back, the professors and students remembered me. That's what's important to me.

What are your favorite aspects about this school?

One thing that I really like about this school is how involved the students are with the Student Government Association (SGA) and all the clubs we have on campus. I have been a very active member of the SGA and have worked with various people around campus to make this school the best it can be.

Recently, the school redesigned the library and we now have an Information Commons above the library to study and use the computers and printers. It has been a great addition to this school to give us more opportunity to study and do homework.

Posted by on in Rick's View

Anna Maria College is a great choice for continuing your education. It offers a variety of majors within six different academic schools: Business, Fire and Health Sciences, Justice and Social Sciences, Education, Humanities, and Visual and Performing Arts. The class sizes are small so you are able to get to know your professors and receive more individualized attention.

Anna Maria College also offers 17 Men’s and Women’s athletic teams and a diverse group of clubs one can join. More importantly, students go to college to further their education and to gain the knowledge and experience to start a career. AMC has the programs and resources to assist students successfully enter the workforce. The College also has a Fifth year option for students to obtain their master’s degree.

Another positive is Anna Maria College’s affiliation with the Higher Education Collaborative of Central Massachusetts. This organization allows students to take classes at 11 other schools for no additional cost, which means you can take a class of interest to you that might not be offered at AMC.

Finally, AMC is a great choice because you will get a great education and it will set you up for a successful career.

Posted by on in Rick's View

When I was a senior in high school and looking at colleges, there were a number of factors that were important to me. The first, and one of the more important factors was that I wanted to go to a smaller school. I didn’t want to go to a college where I was just a number in a huge lecture hall. I wanted a school where my professor would know my name and face, and where I could get help if I needed it.

Another factor was the athletic department. I was a member of the golf team in high school and I wanted to play in college. Anna Maria College helped me achieve that goal, and I have had a great time with my fellow team members.

I was also looking for a school that had a variety of majors to choose from because I was unsure if a degree in business was a good choice for me. Because AMC offers so many choices, I was able to take business classes and criminal justice classes to see where I fit best. I decided that business was the right major for me.

Next week I will discuss why I think you should choose Anna Maria College.