Blog posts tagged in President's Blog

Posted by on in President's Blog

Last week as I was scanning the higher ed trade journals, an article caught my eye entitled, “Corruption in Higher Education Appears to Be on the Rise Globally.” In reading the article, I was introduced to an organization new to me … Transparency International.

Transparency International was founded in 1993 and now has 100 national chapters worldwide. This organization describes itself as “independent and accountable” ... stating that they “are politically non-partisan and place great importance on our independence. We alone determine our programmes and activities – no donor has any input into Transparency International’s policies. Our sources of funding are made transparent as is our spending.”

The organization was founded for a simple but challenging purpose … to address corruption in the world in areas of government, business, society and individual lives. The organization takes public positions, conducts research, and is active in many projects throughout the world. One of their recent studies focused on education.

The lengthy study provided two interesting and important perspectives. First, there is a delineation of corrupt practices. In the United States, the most challenging concern is plagiarism. This finding comes as no surprise to those of us who teach college students. We continue to find evidence of students using someone else’s work as their own or more commonly, using the “cut and paste” feature on their computers without appropriate citation and reference.

The corruption problems in other parts of the world are more pervasive. The report cites entire systems of education that are totally corrupt. Unethical practices include widespread falsification of grades, payoffs to faculty and administrations prior to completion of degrees, requirements to purchase professors’ books in order to receive a passing grade, sexual exploitation of students by faculty and administrators and falsification of applications.

While most of these systemic problems were found to a greater extent in other parts of the world, falsification of application materials is also an issue in this country. This study found this problem to be more common with international students seeking to study in this country who submit personal statements written by someone else and falsified Toefl and other language proficiency scores.

But a large part of this study may be even more important than exposing corrupt practices. The report reflects the organization’s priority to “ensure that the next generation is prepared to say no to corruption.” It describes a number of specific actions and strategies to combat corruption, and address the abuse of power, bribery and secret dealings that are “corroding the educational experience.” The report challenges governments, international organizations, businesses, educational systems, and civil society to “ensure good governance is promoted in education policy all over the world.”

In reading this report, I was simultaneously depressed and enthusiastic. It is sad to see the continued evidence of corruption and the erosion of integrity in the educational systems throughout the world. Teaching and learning are noble professions and I always want to believe that those who choose to teach and lead educational institutions do so with a commitment to truth, fairness and quality.

But this report also embraces the value of shaping both minds and hearts. While we have a responsibility to provide students with knowledge, we must also help them to develop wisdom. We are responsible to help them develop values that will serve their personal goals and the Common Good.

I encourage you to visit the website of Transparency International. The battle to overcome corruption may be daunting, but this organization is fighting the good fight!

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Posted by on in President's Blog

Typically, I change the topic of my blog from week to week. The exception is when I am commenting on a large study where the data and findings seem better shared over several weeks. I had a new topic in mind for this week, but then the reactions to last week’s blog came pouring in.

From week to week, I receive 20-30 responses to my blog. Last week’s blog on “What Would Pope Francis Say?” generated over 70 responses. About half agreed with my perspective. The rest were critical and followed two lines of thought.

Some argued that the Pope didn’t mean that issues related to life and contraception were not paramount in the Church. For these responders, this is the first and primary issue about which the Church should speak and advocate.

Others argued against big government and social service programs. If I ever see a picture of Pope Francis reading Dr. Seuss, perhaps these responders are correct that the Pope’s position is similar in some way to that of Senator Ted Cruz. But I really don’t think so.

First, none of us can really speak for Pope Francis. It is a rhetorical question. But what is clear after six months of his papacy is that this Pope is still an enigma. His every word and action is interpreted and used to advocate for a position. But we all need to listen more, read more, pray more, reflect more … and over time, we will come to understand his vision and his leadership for the Church and for the world.

My major concern, however, is with those who argue for a narrow agenda for the Church and a singular definition. If one agrees that the dignity of human life is paramount in the teachings of the Church, why is this the only issue about which the Church could, should, must speak? There are many Gospel values that we share with fellow Christians and people of all faiths and traditions. Shouldn’t the Church also speak out about injustice throughout culture and the world? Shouldn’t Church leaders speak out often and loudly?

More important, I find it difficult to accept the most narrow interpretation of the dignity of life. I share the belief in the sanctity of life and the need to protect unborn children. But the dignity of life that I read about in the Gospels and I hear preached about by Pope Francis has equal concern for the sick and the poor; the young and the old; the able and the disabled.

As passionate as the Church is about abortion and life issues, should we not also be as concerned that all people have health insurance and access to medical care; that all people have enough food and are paid a livable wage; that all people live free of war, violence and abuse; that all people are treated with respect and dignity; that all people experience the love of God if only through each of us?

Last week, the students of Anna Maria College, assisted by our Campus Ministry Department, sponsored a Homelessness Awareness Week. Every day, these dedicated students learned about issues related to homelessness, engaged in community service to directly help and support the homeless in our region, and even slept outside overnight with little comfort to experience if only briefly what it is like to be homeless. I was honored and humbled to address these students at their closing prayer service. Words can not describe how proud I am of their commitment to gospel values and their response to a call to action.

Homelessness Awareness Week is an expression of dignity of life. Social service programs are an expression of dignity of life. I cannot wait to hear what else Pope Francis helps us to better understand as we walk our journey of faith and service.

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

Posted by on in Matt's Corner
Social media has evolved into a major communication tool with tweets and posts linking students in seconds. Social media supporters believe that the rise in its use by students beyond social relations is helpful, while others argue the opposite. So the question to explore is: Does social media help students?
 
Studies done by researchers at Michigan State University have concluded that students who have almost little to no experience with the college application process have shown to uncover the information they need through social media. The results of the study also concluded that the students who were applying to college who needed help with the process found most of their answers by looking them up on social media venues. Students also used Facebook to contact current students at the colleges they were applying to in order to get a better understanding of what the life of a student is like. With social media chiming in at moments like these, it shows how useful it has become beyond the point of entertainment and that it is also becoming an important part of our lives.
 
What can be learned from the social media explosion is that it is important that whenever a new phenomenon sweeps through our society, we consider it from all sides. Since social media rooted itself in our society we have acknowledged its downsides. However, over recent years, society as a whole has found ways to incorporate social media so that it is more useful and beneficial, rather than distracting and distasteful.
 
So, if social media can help students attain more information on the college application process as shown in the Michigan State study, then it stands to reason that it can continue to help students throughout the college years. Do you agree with this? How else have you seen social media exhibit positive outcomes in college or university life?

Posted by on in President's Blog

Ten days ago, the world read with fascination and interest the interview conducted with Pope Francis six months into his papacy. For Catholics and non-Catholics alike, Pope Francis has been interesting to listen to and observe as he reveals more and more his approach to leading the Church.

Many, who are often uncomfortable with the grandeur of the hierarchy in contrast to the message of the Gospels, are energized by Pope Francis’ choices to live in community and in a more simple lifestyle. His spontaneous and never-ending pastoral approach and his smile are infectious.

But what is more important is to listen … to really listen to his words. While clearly conservative in his theology, Pope Francis seems determined to reframe the world’s understanding of the message and meaning of the Church rooted in hospitality to all and a spirit of hope.

The headlines ten days ago focused on the Pope’s concern that the focus of the Church in recent years has been too limited to teachings related to abortion, gay marriage and the use of contraception. While clearly affirming these teachings the day after his interview was released, Pope Francis called for “a new balance; otherwise even the moral edifice of the Church is likely to fall like a house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of the Gospel.”

As one would expect, the news reports simply highlight only the most surprising comments made by the Pope in this interview. I would strongly urge those seriously interested in Pope Francis and his leadership to read the entire interview, readily available online. It helps us to understand better the depth and spirituality of this man. It also helps to understand Jorge Mario Bergoglio’s life (For Italian opera fans like me, it was wonderful to read the Pope’s reference to Puccini’s great work, Turandot, in his response regarding the importance of hope!).

Over the past two weeks, the reactions to the Pope’s statements have been relatively few from within the Church. Hopefully, his vision of the Church will be embraced in word and deed by dioceses all over the world. But I wonder?

On the same day that the Pope’s interview was released, the House of Representatives in Washington voted to cut $40 billion dollars from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, more commonly known as the Food Stamps program. The rationale for this draconian decision was the improving economy and the waste in the program.

If waste was the primary criterion for reducing government programs, they should all be cut immediately. Administering federal programs of this magnitude have an inherent element of mismanagement and abuse. The fact is that a high number of Americans still cannot afford food and basic sustenance. The percentage of families in Worcester County who qualify for food stamps is 20%. There may be signs of an improving economy, but not among the poorest of our neighbors.

In light of Pope Francis’ speech, I have been waiting to hear the American Catholic Church speak out against this potential cut in a critical program in this country. I scan the web and news reports regularly, but have yet to find any statements from Church leaders. I was hopeful when I found an article entitled, “Food Stamp Cuts a Cruel Proposal.” But this well written critique of this potential congressional decision was authored by political strategist Donna Brazile.

Maybe Church leaders have been silent because they assume this legislation will not pass the Senate. But maybe they are silent because it does not relate to the limited moral issues so prevalent in the rhetoric today. Maybe it would help if they would read the interview with Pope Francis. Because I wonder … if Pope Francis was an American Cardinal … what would he say? Actually, I think I know!

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

A brief introduction
 
It's a normal afternoon for college students. They sit down at a lunch table with their friends after class to get something to eat and catch up with each other. Given that it is 2013, their conversation could go anywhere. However, chances are that at some point or another, some aspect of social media will be brought up. Whether it's "Oh, did you see who Tweeted this?" or "Hey, did you see what she wrote on Facebook?". The truth is, this is the new norm.
 
In this day and age social media has become a part of our culture, so much so, that it's considered a social norm, used by anyone for any reason. With the growth of technology, even over the past few years, social media has found countless platforms to allow its users to immerse themselves in a vast network of online news, blogs, social interactions, and countless other venues. Since the dawn of social media, it has evolved into a primary method of communicating, getting our news, and promoting a culture dominated by technology and the Internet. When considering these facts, one can't help but stop and think how this might be affecting higher education and what impact it has had on students and the institution itself?
 
From my perspective, social media has taken over higher education in many ways, none of which I would say is negative, as social media is now being used by faculty and staff just as frequently as students. All across college campuses throughout the country, social media is becoming an integral part of day-today life for the entire campus community. . Just in the past three years that I have been in college, I have seen social media everywhere I go. Nearly every club and organization at Anna Maria College uses some form of social media to market their club, communicate between club members, and reach out to other students, as well as advertise for their events. Social media is even evident on the professional level just as much as it is on the student level. The admissionteam relies on the benefits of social media to help them connect with prospective students, as well as share the wealth of information about the School. Just on the admission page alone incoming freshmen can find links to pages on the Anna Maria website that directly brings them to their point of interest, whetherr one is looking for residence life, student activities, how to deposit, or even how to find email addresses to talk to admission councilors or faculty members. Students can also find Anna Maria on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google +, and Instagram, as well as Linkedin.
 
This is just a small example of how social media has found itself at the center of higher education. I hope to discuss more about this in my next blog...