General Education Course Descriptions 

AMC 100 First Year Seminar (3)

The First Year Seminar is designed to orient students to life at Anna Maria College. The primary aim of the course is to prepare students for the academic, social, and emotional changes they may face during their transition to Anna Maria and to provide the skills necessary for a successful college experience. This course will support students in the development of their academic skills, including critical reading and thinking, writing and oral presentation, and information literacy, the use of electronic technology for learning, study skills, and academic integrity. In addition, this course will advise students in life skills critical to success in college and beyond. Skills such as time management, wellness, civic engagement, social responsibility, personal ethics, cultural competency, and personal growth will be addressed.

A grade of C or better is required for graduation.

ENG 102 Foundations (3)

Foundations (ENG 102) is a writing course for students who need to further develop the basic skills needed for formal academic writing. By focusing on stylistic and grammatical conventions, ENG 102 prepares students for success in ENG 103, ENG 104, and beyond. Students improve their knowledge of English grammar, usage, and vocabulary by completing a variety of writing-centered activities. Among the many writing and reading assignments, ENG 102 students practice pre-writing techniques, sentence construction (in the context of short writing assignments), and paragraph organization. This course will also introduce students to the conventions of the academic essay. A grade of C or better is required to move on to ENG 103. This course may only be repeated twice. If a student does not receive a C or better after 3 attempts the student will be dismissed from the college

ENG 103 Freshman Composition (3)

Freshman Composition (ENG 103) focuses more intensively on building student skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing. Its course goals include the development of analytical reading, thoughtful discussion, evidence-based arguments, composition, draft writing, self-editing, and research skills. By the end of the course, students will be prepared for all aspects of academic writing, including the essay, research paper, and the accompanying skills of developing a thesis and preparing a page of sources in varied academic styles (MLA, APA, Chicago). A grade of C or better is required to move on to ENG 104. This course may only be repeated twice. If a student does not receive a C or better after 3 attempts the student will be dismissed from the college.

ENG 104 Writing Through Literature (3)

Writing through Literature (ENG 104) introduces students to the essential tools for understanding and analyzing literary texts and writing insightful arguments about them. In addition, students will examine language, ideas, and the cultural/political values of works of literature and what they reveal about our evolving, increasingly global society. This course uses poetry, drama, and fiction/creative nonfiction texts to build on skills acquired in ENG 103 and increase proficiency in analytical reading, thoughtful discussion, evidence-based arguments, composition, draft writing, self-editing, and research skills. Students will be prepared for various aspects of academic writing, including the explication essay, comparative essay, and research paper with accompanying annotated bibliography. A grade of Cor better is required for graduation. This course may only be repeated twice. If a student does not receive a C or better after 3 attempts the student will be dismissed from the college.

PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Introduction to the discipline of philosophy. Course focuses on the most fundamental questions that human beings have always asked. Topics include a critical examination of theories about reality and truth, moral values and social justice, personal identity and free will, aesthetic values, and systems of religious beliefs.

THE 210 Introduction to Theology (3)

Theology is an ongoing search for understanding and truth about God, humanity and all reality. It is a core discipline of the Catholic intellectual tradition. The study of theology involves a structured exploration of the Bible, Tradition and Church teaching. Topics studied in this course are: one God in three divine Persons; creation and new creation; sin and forgiveness; the Church and the communion of saints. This course builds on the introductory course in philosophy and also prepares students to take other theology courses at the college.

Capstone Seminar (3)

In their Senior year, usually in the spring semester, students are required to take a Capstone

Seminar. The intention of this seminar is both integrative and professional: A Capstone Seminar is structured as an interdisciplinary course that integrates the student’s coursework in their major field with the skills and knowledge acquired throughout the General Education Curriculum experience. Capstone Seminars typically involve individual research or other projects and may be integrated with service learning or internship requirements.

Global Language I and II (6)

To acquire minimal conversational level in a foreign language and develop corresponding cultural competence, each AMC student will be required to take any two courses in Global Languages. In order to build proficiency, students are strongly encouraged to complete two sequential global language courses.

Upon completion of this requirement, the student will be able to identify and reproduce the basic sounds and rhythms of the language, analyze the basic principles of grammar and structure introduced at this level, and apply these principles in oral and written communication, as well as communicate with others in the language about simple topics of everyday life.


Currently available courses include Spanish, Italian, French, and American Sign Language.

Students are exempt from the first course in the Global Language sequence through successful completion of at least two years of a global language in high school. 

Exemption from the entire Global Language requirement (both courses) requires proof of competency in a Global Language other than English. The exemption is granted either through documentation (such as school transcripts) showing a student to be fluent in a language other than English and/or demonstration of that competency through an interview with an individual designated by the School of Humanities.

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