The Heart of the Matter: Part II

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Last week I began my discussion of a recent report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, developed by its Commission on the Humanities and the Social Sciences entitled, “The Heart of the Matter: The Humanities and Social Sciences for a Vibrant, Competitive, and Secure Nation.”  Last week I provided an overview of the report and shared why I believe this report is so important.  This week, I want to begin to discuss the content in more detail.

 

The report focuses its analyses and recommendations on five areas:1) K-12 Education; 2) Two and Four Year Colleges; 3) Research; 4) Cultural Institutions and Lifelong Learning; and, 5) International Security and Competitiveness.

 

In each of these areas, the Commission’s recommendations are framed by three overarching goals that they believe cannot be achieved by science alone:

 

1. To educate Americans in the knowledge, skills, and understanding they will need to thrive in the twenty-first century democracy;

2. To foster a society that is innovative, competitive, and strong; 

3. To equip the nation for leadership in an interconnected world.

 

Here are their overall recommendations related to each of these goals:

 

To educate Americans in the knowledge, skills, and understanding they will need to thrive in the twenty-first century democracy.

Because education in the humanities and social sciences not only allow learning about the “what”, but also the “how” and “why”, the Commission recommends:

     -Support for full literacy as the foundation for all learning;

     -Investment in the preparation of citizens; 

     -Increased access to online resources, including teaching materials.

 

To foster a society that is innovative, competitive, and strong.

Because the ability to adapt and thrive in a changing world requires “the development of professional flexibility, inquisitiveness, perceptiveness, the ability to put a received idea to a new purpose, and the capacity to share and build ideas with others," the Commission recommends:

     -Increased investment in research and discovery;

     -The creation of cohesive curricula to ensure basic competencies;

     -Strengthening support for teachers; 

     -Encouraging all disciplines to address “Grand Challenges; 

     -Communicating the importance of research to the public.

 

To equip the nation for leadership in an interconnected world.

In order to participate in the global economy, we need to understand diverse cultures and be sensitive to different perspectives, the Commission recommends,

     -Promotion of language learning;

     -Expansion of education in international affairs and transnational studies;

     -Support for study abroad and international exchange programs; 

     -The development of a “Culture Corps.”

 

These are ambitious goals and recommendations.  But they are central to individual and national competitiveness and success.  Next week, more details and some of my thoughts and reflections.

 

(As always, your comments and questions are welcome.)

 

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Guest Sunday, 13 July 2014